Medical School Talk: What Sort of Training Do Urologists Have?

h2 - Medical School Talk: What Sort of Training Do Urologists Have?

The field of Urology is often one which has people quite confused or just generally puzzled. People tend to wonder what the path to becoming an Urologist is. This is what I shall be discussing today! Hello and welcome back to my blog! I truly appreciate the feedback that I received from the previous post. I shall be making another Q&A post later on in the life of this site.

I hope that you guys will continue to give me your support! Without further ado, let’s get started!

How Do You Train to Be a Urologist?

When you want to be a Urologist, there is quite a long road ahead waiting for you. It all, of course, starts with:

Education

Before you start going to medical school, you will need to pass a four-year pre-medical school degree in University. This is one of the major requirements for you to get accepted into Medical School. Once you get accepted, you will have to undergo around 4 years of training. On the 3rd and 4th year of your medical training, you will have to do mandatory clinical rounds. Most budding Urologists will select Urology rounds as an elective in order to get a head start.

h1 - Medical School Talk: What Sort of Training Do Urologists Have?

Residency

After graduating from medical school, the residency starts. This residency, which focuses on Urology in particular, will last a minimum of five years. As you may not be aware of, Urology has different branches so if you pick a particular branch like surgery, you will need to add around two years on top of your residency.

Examination

Once you have finished with all your schooling, training, residency, and additional post-residency things, you will be eligible to take the exam in order to be certified. Only those who are board certified in the field of Urology will be allowed to be practicing Urologists.

h3 - Medical School Talk: What Sort of Training Do Urologists Have?

When all is said it done, it can be pretty easy to lump the entire experience into a few sentences. However, this should not give the impression that this journey was easy. Choosing to be a Urologist is a path that is strewn with thorns and thick brushes that you will have to fight through. Given all this information, would you consider a career in urology?